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Ibtihaj Muhammad would have been the perfect flag bearer for a divided US

The Guardian World news: Islam - 4 August, 2016 - 14:51

The image of the Muslim American fencer leading the US Olympic delegation, carrying the flag while wearing a hijab, would have been a powerful rebuke to Trump’s rhetoric

She could have marched through the tunnel on Friday night in a hijab, clutching the American flag. What a moment that would have been for a United States where tolerance has been drowned out by political pomposity. Ibtihaj Muhammad wouldn’t have had to say a word as her country’s flag bearer during the opening ceremonies of the Rio Olympics. The image of a Muslim fencer leading more than 500 Americans into the world’s greatest sporting event would be a statement more potent than any of the invective spilling from Donald Trump’s curled lips.

That the US athletes reportedly made her the second choice to Michael Phelps as flag bearer shows how much they understand the need to show the world that they do not come from a place where intolerance is a virtue. Olympians tend be more worldly and aware of such issues than most sports stars, and most do not live in the bubble that many highly paid professional athletes inhabit. They compete overseas, regularly exposed to new cultures, people and ideas.

Related: Ibtihaj Muhammad: the US fencing star out to challenge intolerance and hate

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Terror and rage: what makes a mass murderer different to a terrorist? | Jeff Sparrow

The Guardian World news: Islam - 4 August, 2016 - 07:52

The contrast between mass killings labelled as ‘terrorism’ and those that aren’t becomes even starker when the crimes look the same

Was the attack terror related?

That’s the central (and sometimes almost the only) question asked now in the immediate aftermath of violence – and for good reason. All of us know that what happens next – the social and political meaning of the crime – hinges almost entirely upon the answer. Speculation about the London stabbing has followed a similar pattern, since everyone knows that a connection to Islamic State (Isis) will entirely change the significance of otherwise uncontested facts.

Related: London stabbing: mental health ‘significant factor’ in Russell Square attack, say police – live

A heavily armed male, or just occasionally males, enter an area where people congregate and begins shooting victims indiscriminately, continuing with the killing until they turn their guns on themselves, or are shot and killed by police.

A particular form of mass killing has emerged in western society in which a gunman slaughters victims, apparently chosen largely at random or selected indiscriminately from a particular social grouping …

Mass killings of this type, unlike family slayings and killings as part of other criminal enterprises, appear to be a modern phenomenon in western society. Reports of autogenic massacres do not even begin to appear until the 20th century and only emerge as a recurring theme in the last 30 years.

From the 1966 massacre committed by Charles Whitman in which he gunned down 16 and wounded 30 atop the University of Texas tower to the 1999 Columbine High School killings, mass public shootings have become increasingly prevalent.

Even though we see relatively high percentages of mass public shootings during the 1930s (17%) and 1940s (23%), there were only 21 incidents that took place between 1900 and 1965. Since 1966, however, there have been 95 more. The increase in mass public shootings has been most apparent since 1980, for over half … have taken place during the last two decades.

Mateen’s profile seems much closer to that of a rampage murderer than a terrorist operative.

Both ideological and non-ideological active shooters tend to be white males in their 30s, with rather dysfunctional adult lives. They tend to be single/divorced, unemployed, have low levels of education, and suffer from mental illness. These similarities suggests that “lone wolves” and “deranged shooters” may be outcomes of the same social and psychological processes.

The only meaningful difference may be that for ideological shooters ideological extremism is intertwined with their personal frustrations and aversions toward society. These findings are consistent with the idea that lone wolves and deranged shooters are but a part of a larger phenomenon of lone-actor grievance-fueled violence. And as such, it is not surprising that they share very similar personal profiles.

The current insistence on entirely separating ideological and non-ideological rampages seems rather perverse

I tell people all the time, nothing I do from this point on in my life is ever going to compare. Ever. I do a lot of panel discussions and things, and I tell people, I could win the lottery today, have $200m, have fast cars, mansions, you name it, and still, it’s not going to compare to that feeling of leading marines, other human beings into combat and doing what we did there. It’s almost like I’m going through the motions now for the rest of my life. It’s a hundred per cent true. If I went out today and became a doctor, a chemist, and found the cure for cancer, I mean nothing … I can’t see anything that will ever compare to that feeling…

And when the burning moment breaks,
And all things else are out of mind,
And only joy of battle takes
Him by the throat, and makes him blind,
[…]
The thundering line of battle stands,
And in the air death moans and sings;
But Day shall clasp him with strong hands,
And Night shall fold him in soft wings.

Related: From Oregon to Australia: the unifying force of far-right resentment | Jason Wilson

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Gun owners who made video of Grand Mufti effigy being shot face calls for ban

The Guardian World news: Islam - 4 August, 2016 - 06:51

Shooting Stuff Australia group on Facebook and YouTube also features videos showing Greens party logo bleeding after being riddled with bullets

A group of Australian gun enthusiasts backed by gun distributors, who filmed violent videos of what appears to be an effigy of the Grand Mufti being shot and incinerated, and Greens party slogans being fired at, face calls to have their gun licences revoked.

A series of videos from the Shooting Stuff Australia Facebook and YouTube pages have sparked concerns about increasingly violent rhetoric being used by some gun owners in Australia.

Related: Adler rapid-fire shotguns imported in thousands despite review

Related: It took one massacre: how Australia embraced gun control after Port Arthur

Related: Import of new 'fast and furious' Adler 110 shotgun sidesteps year-long federal ban

Related: 'Australia has no freedom,' Fox News host claims in discussion on gun laws

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16 For 2016: Muslim Athletes To Watch At The Rio Olympics

Muslim Matters - 2 August, 2016 - 20:15

Ummah Sports

Think about the typical advertising campaign for the Olympic Games.

More often than not, the focus is on finishing: Sticking the landing, crossing the finish line, scoring the gold-medal-winning goal, having one's hand raised in victory.

For this summer's Games of the XXXI Olympiad, more focus seems to be on simply getting things started.

In the seven years since the International Olympic Committee announced Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, as the host of the 2016 Olympics, the event has been plagued by health scares (Zika virus), safety concerns (three athletes have reportedly been kidnapped or robbed recently in Rio), performance-enhancing drugs (Russia's track and field team has been banned for doping), unclean water, financial setbacks and construction roadblocks.

At this point, it will feel like a victory for Rio if the Opening Ceremony scheduled for August 5 actually happens. And if the Closing Ceremony set for August 21 manages to take place, that might be a borderline miracle.

Assuming these Olympics will get started and eventually come to a finish, here are 16 Muslim athletes to watch in Rio:

***** *****

 

 

Aisha Al Balushi

Aisha Al Balushi

AISHA AL BALUSHI
Weightlifting
United Arab Emirates

For the last couple of years, it was understandably assumed that if the United Arab Emirates qualified only one female weightlifter for the Rio Olympics, that one athlete would be Amna Al Haddad — the 26-year-old with Nike sponsorship who has gained global notoriety for breaking barriers by competing in hijab in a sport that only recently saw its international governing body allow women to do so.

But thanks in part to Al Haddad suffering a recent back injury, 24-year-old Al Balushi was the one lifter (male or female) chosen to represent UAE in Rio. She is not unqualified for the honor. Al Balushi scored higher marks than Al Haddad at this year's Asian Championships, and she has been involved in the sport almost twice as long as the relative newcomer Al Haddad.

With reigning 58-kilogram (128-pound) world champion Boyanka Kostova of Azerbaijan out of these Olympics due to a PED suspension, Al Balushi's chances of landing on the medal stand automatically improve.

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Muhammad Ali

Muhammad Ali

Muhammad ALI
Boxing
Great Britain

Ali's name carries a lot of weight in his sport, even if his body doesn't. The 20-year-old flyweight (114 pounds / 52 kilograms) is fighting in a weight class in which his country hasn't produced an Olympic medalist since 1968.

Ali brings an impressive amateur resume into the tournament, including a first-place finish at last year's British Championships and a silver medal at the 2014 World Youth Championships.

But as long as he keeps his birth name he'll inevitably be compared to the other Muhammad Ali, a.k.a. “The Greatest,” a.k.a. the former three-time world heavyweight champion and historic megastar who passed away earlier this year.

“He was a good human being,” the younger Ali said of his namesake in a recent interview. “He said what he believed in. And I really respect that about him. I have watched all his fights.”

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Al-Farouq Aminu (left)

Al-Farouq Aminu (left)

AL-FAROUQ AMINU
Basketball
Nigeria

The six-year NBA veteran swings between small forward and power forward for the Portland Trail Blazers, and is considered one of the league's better defenders. His skills on that end of the court will be much-needed if Nigeria runs into Team USA superstars like Kevin Durant and Carmelo Anthony.

Nigeria will need Aminu's offense, too. He averaged a career-high 10.2 points per game this past regular season, then went off for 17.2 points per game while making 55 percent of his three-pointers in Portland's second-round playoff series loss to the eventual Western Conference champion Golden State Warriors.

If Aminu keeps playing at that level, he could team with Detroit Pistons rookie Michael Gbinije and former NBA first-round draft pick Ike Diogu to lead Nigeria out of group play in the country's second-ever Olympic basketball appearance.

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Sarah Attar

Sarah Attar

SARAH ATTAR
Track & Field
Saudi Arabia

Four years ago in London, Attar made history as part of the first-ever delegation of female athletes to represent Saudi Arabia in the Olympics. She then received a standing ovation despite finishing in last place in her opening-round heat of the women's 800-meter race.

At the time, Attar was a college student at Pepperdine University (Malibu, Calif.), where she ran on the track and cross country teams. Since then, the 23-year-old Attar has graduated from school and dedicated herself full-time to training. She has competed in marathons and improved her personal-best time in the 800 to a flat two minutes and 40 seconds.

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Mutaz Essa Barshim

Mutaz Essa Barshim

MUTAZ ESSA BARSHIM
Track & Field
Qatar

Even when he doesn't win the men's high jump competition, Barshim just looks like he's jumping higher than everyone else. Tall, lanky, smooth and effortlessly bouncy, Barshim is track and field's answer to NBA Slam Dunk champion Zach LaVine — except Barshim can get his entire body almost as high as an NBA rim while jumping backwards.

Barshim has collected handfuls of gold medals in Asian and Arab regional championships, as well as a gold medal from the 2014 World Indoor Championships. He has threatened to break the high jump world record; his personal best of 2.43 meters (7 feet, 11.5 inches) is the second-highest jump in history behind Cuban legend Javier Sotomayor's 2.45-meter (8 feet, 0.25 inches) leap from 1993.

Barshim, however, is still reaching for the two highest prizes in his sport, that being Olympic and outdoor World Championship gold. He earned a bronze medal at the 2012 Olympics and a silver at the outdoor 2013 World Championships.

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Mahama Cho

Mahama Cho

MAHAMA CHO
Taekwondo
Great Britain

The son of former African taekwondo champion Zakaia Cho, Mahama left his native Ivory Coast as a child to move to Europe, where he took up his father's sport and represented France and later Great Britain on the international level.

The 26-year-old Cho is ranked No. 6 in the world in the men's over-80-kilograms (176 pounds) division and finished in first place at the European Olympic qualifying tournament. He won a gold medal at the 2013 World Taekwondo Grand Prix, and a silver at the 2014 tournament.

“I promote my religion to the best of my ability through my sport,” Cho said in an Ummah Sports feature in 2014. “In my life, showing a good image and then letting people know that I am Muslim is why I think people end up attracted to me. They don't concentrate on the negativity of Islam but the beauty of what I do as a professional through Islam.”

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Mo Farah

Mo Farah

MO FARAH
Track & Field
Great Britain

Farah, 33, is the world's marquee name in distance running. And after Jamaican sprinting superstar Usain Bolt, Farah is perhaps the planet's most famous active track and field athlete.

At the last three major outdoor championships — the 2012 Olympics in London, the 2013 World Championships in Moscow and the 2015 World Championships in Beijing — Farah hogged all of the gold by sweeping the men's 5,000-meter and 10,000-meter races.

Whether it's his specialty races on the track, half-marathons and marathons on the road, or in cross country races through the woods, Farah is expected to win just about every time he steps to the starting line. Sometimes he has entire delegations of runners from other countries aiming to literally block him from finishing first. And still, most of the time Farah winds up doing his popular “Mo-Bot” victory celebration — before his customary sujood prostration to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) on the track.

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Habiba Ghribi

Habiba Ghribi

HABIBA GHRIBI
Track & Field
Tunisia

Ghribi came across the finish line in second place in the women's 3,000-meter steeplechase at the 2012 Olympics and the 2011 World Championships, but was awarded the gold medals for both races earlier this year after first-place finisher Yulia Zaripova of Russia was retroactively disqualified for doping.

In Rio, Ghribi's goal is to earn the gold in the old-fashioned way of beating everyone else on the track.

Last year, Ghribi ran the fourth-fastest time ever in her event at 9:05.36, an African record. This year, she is peaking at just the right time for an Olympic triumph, posting a season's best 9:21.35 on July 23 in London.

***** *****

 

 

Jessica Houara-d'Hommeaux

Jessica Houara-d'Hommeaux

JESSICA HOUARA-D'HOMMEAUX
Soccer
France

One of the few women's soccer teams with a realistic chance of upsetting the powerhouse U.S. squad for gold is France. Houara-d'Hommeaux has a track record of success against the Americans, scoring one of her three career international goals against them in a 2015 upset victory in a friendly match.

The 28-year-old midfielder plays professionally for Paris Saint-Germain in France's Division 1 Feminine, where her teams have won the Coupe de France Feminine and finished second in the UEFA Women's Champions League. She also helped France to a fourth-place finish at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Last year, Houara-d'Hommeaux posed for a photo in the French magazine Surface wearing a hoodie like a hijab headscarf and soccer netting over her face similar to a niqab. Wearing a niqab in public is illegal in France, a controversial and polarizing law that made Houara-d'Hommeaux's photo a bold choice.

A Sports Illustrated article said: “Given Houara's Algerian descent, the image does not seem to be about appropriating or parodying the veil. It is not a comment about the oppression of Muslim women. Instead, the portrait seems to be about quietly slaying some misconceptions. After all, it is not often that hijab is associated with athletic achievement and inclusiveness.”

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Abdul Khalili

Abdul Khalili

ABDUL KHALILI
Soccer
Sweden

In his day job, Khalili plays midfielder for Mersin Idmanyurdu in Turkey's Super Lig and has scored 17 goals in his professional career. In his spare time, he is a rising star in his native Sweden's national team program.

Khalili helped the Swedish under-21 squad to a first-place finish at the 2015 UEFA European Championship for his age group, beating Portugal in the final match. This year, Khalili could help his country's senior national team to its first Olympic medal since Sweden took bronze at the 1952 Summer Games in Helsinki, Finland.

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Ibtihaj Muhammad

Ibtihaj Muhammad

 

 

IBTIHAJ Muhammad
Fencing
United States

Muhammad, 30, will make history when she steps into Carioca Arena 3 for her first match in the women's sabre fencing competition in Rio. She will become the first U.S. athlete in any sport to compete in the Olympics while wearing a hijab headscarf.

In the meantime, Muhammad has been catching up to former NBA superstar Hakeem Olajuwon as perhaps the most famous Muslim athlete to ever compete for Team USA in the Olympics. (Muhammad Ali was still going by his birth name, Cassius Clay, and had not yet converted to Islam when he boxed at the 1960 Olympics in Rome.) She has appeared on talk shows such as “Ellen” and been featured in magazines such as Elle. She has met with President Barack Obama at the White House. The clothing line she founded for women who want to dress modestly, called Louella, is gaining in popularity. She has over 51,000 followers on Instagram and over 14,000 followers on Twitter. TIME magazine named Muhammad one of their “100 Most Influential People in the World” for 2016.

Muhammad is ranked No. 8 in the world by the International Fencing Federation and will have more eyes on her than any Olympic fencer in recent memory. But even if she doesn't win a medal in Rio, she has already scored victories for Muslims all over the country and around the world.

***** *****

Adrien Niyonshuti

Adrien Niyonshuti

ADRIEN NIYONSHUTI
Cycling
Rwanda

There is not a more compelling “tragedy to triumph” story in these Olympics than that of Niyonshuti. When he was just seven years old, six of his brothers were killed in the infamous Rwandan genocide of 1994.

After learning how to ride a bicycle as a teenager, Niyonshuti was spotted by cycling legend Jonathan Boyer (the first American to compete in the Tour de France) during a charity mission to Rwanda and taken under his wing. Niyonshuti soon became the first Rwandan to compete on Europe's professional cycling circuit and qualified for the 2012 Olympics in cross-country mountain biking. He was his country's flag-bearer in the Opening Ceremony. After the Olympics, he opened the Adrian Niyonshuti Cycling Academy in Rwanda.

In Rio, the 29-year-old will compete in the men's road race.

***** *****

 

 

Hassan Rahimi

Hassan Rahimi

HASSAN RAHIMI
Wrestling
Iran

Ranked No. 2 in the world in the 57-kilogram (126-pound) weight class in men's freestyle wrestling, Rahimi was predicted to win the gold medal in this month's Sports Illustrated Olympic preview issue. Of the four Iranian men's freestyle wrestlers picked to medal, Rahimi was the only one picked to win gold. (Iran's Hamid Souryan Reihanpour was predicted to win gold in the 59-kilo (130-pound) men's Greco-Roman wrestling division.)

Rahimi, 27, will try to make up for a disappointing 2012 Olympics in which he finished eighth after losing his second-round match to India's Amit Kumar. Since that letdown of a performance, Rahimi has won gold (2013), bronze (2014) and silver (2015) medals at the Wrestling World Championships.

***** *****

 

 

Siddikur Rahman

Siddikur Rahman

SIDDIKUR RAHMAN
Golf
Bangladesh

Golf is back in the Olympics for the first time since 1904. But due to fears over the Zika virus — and perhaps a little issue with a lack of adequate prize money — a lot of the world's best golfers have turned down invitations to play in Rio.

But in the absence of big-name stars like Tiger Woods steps the man referred to as the “Tiger Woods of Bengal.” As an amateur, Rahman won 12 tournaments in Asia. Since turning pro in 2005, he has notched two wins on the Asian Tour — the first golfer from Bangladesh to win on the tour — and six wins on the Tour of India.

***** *****

 

 

Leila Rajabi

Leila Rajabi

LEILA RAJABI
Track & Field
Iran

After marrying Iranian sprinter Peyman Rajabi and becoming an Iranian citizen, Belarus native Leila Rajabi converted to Islam, changed her name, and quickly went about the business of becoming the best female shot-putter to ever represent Iran.

Rajabi owns the national record in the shot put at 18.18 meters (59 feet, 7 inches). She has won gold medals at the Asian Indoor Games and the Asian Indoor Championships, as well as silver at the Asian Games (outdoor) and the Asian Championships.

***** *****

 

 

Elif Yale Yesilirmak

Elif Yale Yesilirmak

 

 

 

ELIF JALE YESILIRMAK
Wrestling
Turkey

Yesilirmak is a two-time bronze medalist in the 58-kilogram (128-pound) women's freestyle division at the Wrestling World Championships, a two-time bronze medalist at the European Championships, and a gold medalist at the 2013 Mediterranean Championships.

Yesilirmak converted to Islam after moving to Turkey from her native Russia. In 2012, she became the first female wrestler to represent Turkey in the Olympics. She failed to reach the medal stand in London, but has won medals at four major wrestling meets since then. Yesilirmak has also been a prominent figure in the growth of women's wrestling in Turkey; the country is bringing five female wrestlers to the Rio Olympics.

Trump's attacks on Khan family spark renewed outcry among US Muslims

The Guardian World news: Islam - 2 August, 2016 - 13:30

Activists and scholars speak out against Republican nominee’s criticism of Capt Humayun Khan’s family: ‘Just made me very sad as a human being’

Donald Trump’s attacks on the family of the army captain Humayun Khan, who died in combat in Iraq in 2004, has inflamed the candidate’s already poor standing with the Muslim American community, with many saddened and frustrated by his recent remarks.

Related: The world saw a grieving mother. Donald Trump saw a Muslim | Amana Fontanella-Khan

.@realDonaldTrump This is me, giving a talk at @Georgetown. Do I look oppressed to you? #CanYouHearUsNow pic.twitter.com/NVVMJDbnlJ

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France plans mosque funding foundation to stop radicalisation from abroad

The Guardian World news: Islam - 1 August, 2016 - 20:36

Interior minister backs French Muslim council proposal after Normandy attack revives debate over radical overseas influence on worshippers

A new foundation will be created to help finance mosques in France in an effort to prevent the funding of places of worship by radical overseas benefactors, the French Muslim council has said.

Anouar Kbibech, the head of CFCM, proposed that the foundation could be used to fund the construction and running of mosques, paid for by fees from the halal food sector.

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We should relegate terrorists to the obscurity of their own infamy | Bernard-Henri Lévy

The Guardian World news: Islam - 1 August, 2016 - 20:05
Limiting publicity would deny jihadis the glory they crave and reduce the risk of us banalising evil

There are at least three reasons why we should stop publicising the names of violent jihadists who commit acts of terror. The first is that by doing so – by publishing and republishing their faces, living or (especially) dead – they become globally recognised characters in the showbusiness side of this terrorist war, thus fulfilling one of their keenest desires. Consider how during the Bataclan siege in Paris the killers demanded that their hostages call news channels in the moments before the massacre. The radical Islamist who attacked the kosher supermarket the day of the Charlie Hebdo murders took time to phone one of those channels to demand that it correct the banner it was using to identify him. And is it by chance that the mass murderer in Nice left his identity card in his truck for all to see?

Related: French media to stop publishing photos and names of terrorists

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The Guardian view on political rage: what prospect for the old norms? | Editorial

The Guardian World news: Islam - 1 August, 2016 - 20:04
Donald Trump’s attack on the Khan family has set a new low in the way politicians campaign. It is a reminder of the fragility of taboos

Donald Trump says things that no other politician would dare, nor want, to say. His capacity to offend liberal America is an important part of his appeal. His sneering comments about Khizr and Ghazala Khan, the Muslim parents of a young soldier killed in Iraq by a suicide bomber in 2004, today earned him a blistering rebuke from Senator John McCain, himself a victim of the Trump invective. They have provoked another staunch Republican, Sally Bradshaw, who had been a senior adviser to the presidential candidate Jeb Bush, to leave the party and announce that she would support Hillary Clinton if there appeared to be any chance of a Trump victory. But other Republicans have resisted the Khans’ appeal to condemn their presidential candidate. That may be because they recognise that his capacity to say what most of Washington regard as unsayable reaches a part of the country that other candidates do not. The career of an earlier demagogue, Joseph McCarthy, was halted by one unforgettable question: “At long last, have you no sense of decency?” The more revealing question now is to ask what it is about the Trump shamelessness that makes it so attractive.

Mr Trump dramatises the rage of those who feel disenfranchised and he does it by breaking the taboos of political discourse. Every offensive remark he makes reveals a recognition that the shared values on which cultural taboos depend have been catastrophically eroded by joblessness and stagnant pay. Many of Mr Trump’s followers will not be shocked by what he says because they do not think that what seems to others a bizarre and unacceptable attack on rational political discourse violates the codes of honour and decency in the world that they are experiencing. He is the personification of the slogan “Are you thinking what we’re thinking?”, which backfired so disastrously for the then Conservative leader, Michael Howard, in Britain’s 2005 general election. Then, not enough voters were prepared to identify with the anti-immigration message that was part of the Tory campaign. Now, though, the Brexit referendum, like Mr Trump’s presidential campaign, has legitimised a different narrative, where the outrage of the respectable reinforces rather than undermines the message to those who feel excluded. It confirms that the messenger, whether it’s Nigel Farage or Donald Trump, is not part of an alien liberal elite but one of them. In a world dominated by respectable opinion, the vulgarities of Mr Trump only confirm that he’s on their side. He is indeed thinking what they are thinking.

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Nigerian troops should be prosecuted for deadly Zaria clashes – report

The Guardian World news: Islam - 1 August, 2016 - 16:59

Judicial report confirms deaths of 349 Shia Muslims in northern city in December were consequence of army using excessive force

The Nigerian army killed 349 Shia Muslims last December in a series of clashes for which troops involved should be prosecuted, a judicial inquiry has concluded.

How the authorities respond to the report may indicate the extent to which reform is implemented under a drive by the country’s president, Muhammadu Buhari, a former military ruler, to root out human rights violations by soldiers.

Related: Nigerian army killed 350 and secretly buried the bodies, Amnesty says

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The world saw a grieving mother. Donald Trump saw a Muslim | Amana Fontanella-Khan

The Guardian World news: Islam - 1 August, 2016 - 10:14

Ghazala Khan’s silence at the Democratic convention reflected her anguish, but the would-be president painted her as different from other Americans

There are many sinister things in the world. But a mother’s grief isn’t one of them. Yet Donald Trump sees dark undercurrents everywhere – including in the silent homage Ghazala Khan, the mother of the fallen solider Humayun Khan, paid to her son.

“If you look at his wife, she was standing there,” he said, referring to her appearance at the Democratic national convention, in which she stood alongside her husband as he delivered a searing critique of Donald Trump. “She had nothing to say... Maybe she wasn’t allowed to have anything to say. You tell me.”

Scrutinizing the silence of a grieving mother is an unusual move for a would-be president

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