When the BBC tries to demonise Muslims (Ex-Muslim topic)

BBC Scotland Office - Glasgow

What do you do as a news organisation when you think you have a meaty story that could go viral and be popular?

The BBC is like a dog with a bone about the topic of people who are leaving Islam. However, since no one has been that interested in the topic, it hasnt really surfaced much.

So what is an organisation to do when it doesnt gain the expected results the first time (9 January 2015)? Well, ofcourse, try again (8 June 2015) and again (28 September 2015).

I have probably missed a few times this has been attempted it, but the main reason I kept an eye on this particular one is that a couple of times the story was part of a coordinated campaign across multiple media sources.

One day maybe the story will have its desired impact and the Muslim community will be demonised again.

I do not want a licence fee to exist as that symbolises the BBC representing the people when it clearly doesnt. Give it a commercial charter, get rid of the licence fee, allow it to serve ads and fund it through general taxation for the services it carries out for the government.

Comments

The BBC is like a dog with a bone about the topic of people who are leaving Islam. However, since no one has been that interested in the topic, it hasnt really surfaced much.

More or less sums it up, most people don't care about religion, be it Islam or Christian etc. The west as been more or less told a] Religion is a personal thing and does not belong outside of the home or religious institutions. b] The separation of religion and state is now almost complete.

I don't think that the BBC is against Islam in particular, but against religion in general. Look at its response if the Arch-Bishop of Canterbury criticises government policies. He is told in no uncertain manner, "keep religion out of politics, leave politics to professional  politicians". Sometimes with a non too subtle threat to remove Bishops from the House of Lords.

Yet people deep down feel a need to believe in something, if not religion what?

In the 2011 Census, Christianity was the largest religious group in England and Wales with 33.2 million people identifying with the religion, a decrease of 4.1 million from 2001 (from 72% to 59% of the usual resident population). Muslims made up the second largest religious group with 2.7 million people, an increase of 1.2 million (from 3% to 5% of the population). The number of people who reported that they did not have a religion reached 14.1 million people, an increase of 6.4 million (from 15% to 25% of the population).

The above  quote is from the Office of National Statistics.

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/census/2011-census/detailed-characteristic...

If you take a look at the article it shows that the Christian religion [the majority have been born in the UK and have been told/educated the UK/West is a secular state and religion as no place in modern society]. Whilst Atheism is growing [expected] but so is Islam [2% pa]  but not as fast as Atheism [10%pa]

Take a look and follow some of the links, you might find it interesting.

 

I've never really considered the BBC as anti religion in general, mainly because I have not had to consider the Christian (or any other religion) perspective, so I cant really comment on that, though I will keep it in mind when considering their content.

"For too long, we have been a passively tolerant society, saying to our citizens 'as long as you obey the law, we will leave you alone'" - David Cameron, UK Prime Minister. 13 May 2015.