Arab revolt

Syria will continue to bleed in 2013

So far, the Syrian conflict has resulted in a reported 40,000 lives being lost.

There are some estimates that 100,000 lives will be lost over the following year.

Hopefully though the deaths and suffering will be far less than what is expected, and will result in an improvement for the people in Syria, but some of the fighting groups may not please the locals too much.

We need to give greater focus to this (and other conflicts) and not focus just on Palestine (but that also does not mean that the focus on there should be reduced).

It is sometimes easier to focus on other conflicts where Muslims are being oppressed by Non Muslims, but solely focussing on them leaves us open to arguments of bias which belittle out focus on those opressions.

The day that the future hung in the balance

Two important polls going on today:

 

1. Greece.

The people are voting again after the last elections 6 weeks ago proved inconclusive.

The results could decide whether greece stays in the Euro, the EU both, either or none.

Very important european election where there are no guarantees and this could be the first nation to leave the eurozone and that is an unknown as the euro was not built for anyone to leave it ever. Questions exist if it could survive a state leaving and also how bad or good this would be for Greece.

 

2. Egypt.

It's the run off presidential elections the week after the old remnants have been making themselves felt.

Egypt: Disolving the Revolution

The supreme court has called last years parliamentary elections unconstitutional and has also ruled thata former Prime Minister under Mubarak who was legally barred from being president could take part in the upcoming run off presidential elections that will take place this weekend.

This may hand all power (all instead of the 99% that it holds now) back to the military and once again lead the country to a place it is lead by people it doesnt want to be lead by.

Something to keep an eye on.

Syria: Like father like son?

When the arab spring started, I thought that there was a chance it may avoid Syria.

While repressive and the state had a history of cracking down on dissent, I saw some intelligence, and attempts to make Syria not be like all the rest.

However this peace lasted only a few weeks when some elements of the regime cracked down against graffitiing youngsters, which started protests against the regime.

Since then the protests have increased and so has the regimes brutality.

There were words said early on by Bashar al Asad that seemed to suggest he could potentially change the nature of things in Syria and lead to progress that the people could live with.

Syria is burning

I havent blogged about the Arab revolts in a while now.

That isnt because its all over or sorted though.

The current big place of action is Syria - tension has been simmering for the past year and thousands have been killed.

Now it seems that Assad Junior is preparing to go the whole hog like his father with a ground assault on the city of Homs which could leave many more dead and injured.

There have been calls for resolutions from major western powers which have been vetoes by China and Russia - the latter claiming that the former are stoking the unrest.

It is a complicated situation where the government forces are clearly in the wrong, and it seems like it will only get worse.

Run: The Muslims are coming!

Its election season in the arab world, and we are currently on the third election - Egypt.

In the first elections in Tunisia, the Islamic minded party, Al Nahda (arabic for "The Awakening" or "The Renaissance" or dare I say it, "The Revival") was the leading party.

It should get a big say in the interim government which decides the future of the country (however it is possible that all the other parties could unite to keep it out of power).

The second elections were in Morocco last week, where once again, the largest part was the Islamic minded Islamic Justice and Development Party (PJD) won the most seats and with the changes in the country's constitution earlier this year, it means that they will form the govenrment and provide the prime minister in this kingdom democracy.

Muslim democrats beat secular tyranny - again

Tunisia, the prime mover of the Arab Spring, had its first democratic outcome: Last weekend, this small Arab nation held free and fair elections, which had been only a dream under the tyranny of its former dictator, the all-secular Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

Moreover, the winner turned out to be the Islamic-inspired party that the same Ben Ali brutally suppressed for decades: the Renaissance Party, or, with its original name, Ennahda.

Read more @ Hurriyet Daily News

Tunisia goes to the poll stations

Today, Tunisia - the country where the Arab revolt/Arab spring started at the start of the year - goes to the polls.

Much is being said about these elections, with many people having many opinions.

Some fear that Tunisia will fall back from the heights of "feminism" that it reached under the previous secularist govenments which had forced women to uncover.

Others say that if the Islamic minded parties win, then freedom will be eroded.

Ofcourse, the previous governments lacked both feminism and freedom (forcing people into a garbs they do not want to wear is not feminism or freedom - the only "free" people were the ones that benefitted from the misery of the rest).

The Tunisians can now take their destiny into their own hands and we will watch to see how high they can soar.

Gaddafi falls

Well, the rebels have entered Tripoli, there seems to be some sense of jubilation in some segments of the capital while others are still held by Gaddafi's forces.

Gaddafi's son Saif al Islam Gaddafi has been captured and this seems like the ned of the civil war and of the Gaddafi regime.

Now the hard work starts of rebuilding the state - NATO has offered its assistance, which Abdul Bari Atwan of Al Quds on BBC News said was just them/us telling the rebels who is actually in charge.

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