Egypt Protests On The Road To Revolution?

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http://www.presstv.ir/detail/162072.html

Assalamu alaikum

Protests in Egypt, people want to oust Hosni Mubarak. On Youtube google egypt protests 2011. I saw one clip where the crowds made the riot police retreat in fear.

I just wonder what are they protesting for fair democratic rule, or a fair islamic state? Anyone know?

Keep up with it, and insha'Allah pray for the muslim brothers and sisters over there.

P.S Lebanon are also protesting against their new leader hezbullah's najib miqati, youtube it. Also see presstv. But here there is possible sectarian violence, sunnis view it as a religious war against them.

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Inshallah they will get a better replacement.

"Honourable people don't do anything in the name of honour." You, circa January 2011 "Be good, do good and God will help you."

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Hajjar wrote:
P.S Lebanon are also protesting against their new leader hezbullah's najib miqati, youtube it. Also see presstv. But here there is possible sectarian violence, sunnis view it as a religious war against them.

And Jordan. and Algeria.

Still unlikely for anything to happem, but Tunisia was a surprise for everyone and may have given people hope.

"Honourable people don't do anything in the name of honour." You, circa January 2011 "Be good, do good and God will help you."

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Muslim brotherhood? Who exactly are they? what do "Islamic law" mean - do they want to run the country using Shariah law?

Why would it be wrong/dangerous for them to run Egypt? (would it be?)

"How many people find fault in what they're reading and the fault is in their own understanding" Al Mutanabbi

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Shariah law would be pretty cool.

but it really depends on their "interpretation" of Shariah law.

ive heard a lot of "democracy/democratic" on the news though... from the mouth of the protestors...

Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary?

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Lilly wrote:
...ive heard a lot of "democracy/democratic" on the news though... from the mouth of the protestors...

Some may give democracy etc a bad name or dislike the concept, but it allows people to express themselves and the people of Egypt are Muslims, so their expression should be pretty Islamic.

Maybe not perfect, but even if there was a different form of government if people did not want to follow an Islamic principle, it could still be overlooked.

A libertarian state is IMO a good thing to have.

"Honourable people don't do anything in the name of honour." You, circa January 2011 "Be good, do good and God will help you."

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libertarian?

i still think the type of state that was set up after the prophet pbuh 's death is the best.

Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary?

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Lilly wrote:
libertarian?

The idea that the state does not interefere with peoples lives - unless it comes to things like crime tc.

Lilly wrote:
i still think the type of state that was set up after the prophet pbuh 's death is the best.

That also requires the people to be like those too.

"Honourable people don't do anything in the name of honour." You, circa January 2011 "Be good, do good and God will help you."

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yh i understand that people dont want Egypt to be ruled my Islamists (whatever that is)and no Sharia law, but since Egypt is a muslim state doesnt that go hand in hand with Sharia law???

"Verily, in the remembrance of Allah, do hearts find rest"

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Army Taking Charge

And what they are like is anybody's guess.

  • It can never be satisfied, the mind, never. -- Wallace Stevens
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There was an internal sort of coup at the start anyway.

And no, they are not any better.

Not only was the current vice president Mubarak's right hand man, there have been claims that the army has detained and tortured protesters:

The Egyptian military has secretly detained hundreds and possibly thousands of suspected government opponents since mass protests against President Hosni Mubarak began, and at least some of these detainees have been tortured, according to testimony gathered by the Guardian.

It will probably also continue the same policies that got the people to where they are now.

Its like a step to the side with no real or concrete change if the army does "take charge".

Rumours are that at 8pm GMT, Hosni will announce that he is to step down on State TV.

I also hear that the state TV is currently playing an Egyptian themed version of

"Honourable people don't do anything in the name of honour." You, circa January 2011 "Be good, do good and God will help you."

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Smile Points for Chris Morris vids.

I was reading an Arab News editorial view the other day, and you getting a fairly irrelevant link into this thread reminded me. Obviously I am already inclined to favour the argument, but I want to know what you think.
http://arabnews.com/opinion/article253715.ece

Egypt under Mubarak handled a lot of money. If Sadat had not been assassinated it would have been in his interests to share the proceeds of his radical peace policy - the gas deal, military provisions, all of these should have made the public richer. Mubarak though protected himself and perhaps a liberal ideology for himself, and treated the public as a danger to be controlled. I don't think he was a terrible dictator by comparison with dictators, but he was a dictator anyway. Egyptian soldiers scare the crap out of me, not because they are cold and disciplined, but because they are angry and armed and away from Cairo pretty much unsupervised. So my thinking is that the Egyptians and Israelis are not natural enemies, but I expect the Muslim Brotherhood and the heavily indoctrinated street to drag their heels if they ever come around.

If this becomes about a MB coup so as to be belligerent I do not think Egypt will ever recover. I think it was a mistake not to engage the student protesters, who want democracy, rather than the political opposition, who want power.

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Joie de Vivre wrote:
Obviously I am already inclined to favour the argument, but I want to know what you think.
http://arabnews.com/opinion/article253715.ece

I agree with it.

The whole conspirational thinking also makes people weaker and becomes a self fulfilling prophesy IMO (not in that others managed to engineer their defeat, but the actual defeat itself).

"Honourable people don't do anything in the name of honour." You, circa January 2011 "Be good, do good and God will help you."

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No.

"Honourable people don't do anything in the name of honour." You, circa January 2011 "Be good, do good and God will help you."

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Joie de Vivre wrote:
Army Taking Charge
  • It can never be satisfied, the mind, never. -- Wallace Stevens
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Well, in a way it already did with the last reshuffke, which got rid of the people that didn't have military backgrounds.

However, Al Jazeera also had a scrolling headline that the army stopped Hosni Mubarak from making his speech earlier in which he was to transfer all his authority to his number 2.

The events of today may revitalise people though - they may have been tiring and thinking it is going nowhere, but from there to "certainty" and back to nothing is quite an emotional cycle, which cna push people.

"Honourable people don't do anything in the name of honour." You, circa January 2011 "Be good, do good and God will help you."

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I also read somewhere that Washington has lost its monetary control over the situation as before it was threatening the aid package, but Saudi Arabia has stepped in and said it will continue to provide that money if the US pulls out.

I can see why the Saudi's like the idea of regimes surviving - no matter how stable they seem currently, falling dominoes can have unexpected results.

"Honourable people don't do anything in the name of honour." You, circa January 2011 "Be good, do good and God will help you."

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However much the MB might have decided that what is wants for now is democracy, it will become an issue that there is no organised liberal opposition. I can understand Mubarak wanting to engineer a transition - for a lot of reasons it strikes me as a good thing. If the issue is trust then I understand the ongoing protests. But I suspect the MB poses problems for both Mubarak and the army, and the world, beyond self-interest.

  • It can never be satisfied, the mind, never. -- Wallace Stevens
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Finally, if you don't already have the TV or radio on.

  • It can never be satisfied, the mind, never. -- Wallace Stevens
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yup.

Power was transferred to the military in breach of the constitution, so it is a coup in some ways.

I wonder if the road ahead will be a positive one or not.

"Honourable people don't do anything in the name of honour." You, circa January 2011 "Be good, do good and God will help you."